How to write a letter: Find the Mistakes!

20 Feb 2016 09:15 350
233,781
2,448 68

Can you find all the mistakes in these sample sentences? I've chosen 8 mistakes students make when they write letters. Learning these common mistakes will make you a better writer in minutes! This is a great lesson to test your English because it includes a variety of English writing skills from grammar to spelling. To improve your writing, you'll also learn some great written expressions to use when you are writing in English. So whether you have to write for work/business, school, or an English proficiency exam like IELTS or TOEFL, check out this fun lesson and learn to write correctly! Continue to test yourself by taking the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/how-to-write-a-letter-find-the-mistakes/

TRANSCRIPT

Hi. I'm Rebecca from engVid, and this lesson will help you to write better letters. Whether you need to write a letter for your IELTS exam, or at work, or in life in general, this lesson will help you because we're going to focus on eight common letter-writing mistakes. Okay? Let's see if you know what they are, and also how to correct them. Okay.

Number one: "I look forward to see you.", "I look forward to see you." What's wrong with that? Well, this is a very common error, actually. Most people don't realize that they're making it, but it's a really important thing to correct. So, it should be not: "I look forward to see you." But: "I look forward to seeing you.", "I look forward to seeing you.", "I look forward to meeting you.", "I look forward to discussing these ideas with you." Right? Whatever verb you put here, you need to say it or write it with "ing". Remember that. Okay.

Next, number two: "Tanks your letter." Okay? This person has written: "Tanks your letter." Now, the person actually wants to say: "Thanks", but many people make a mistake, first of all, in the spelling of this word. It does have an "h" in it, so it should be: "Thanks", and then there's another mistake. Right now it says: "Thanks your letter." But that's not correct. It should be: "Thanks", what's the right preposition? "Thanks", "Thanks for your letter." Okay? Or: "Thank you for your letter." Okay.

Next, number three: "Please to give my regard to Mr. Smith.", "Please to give my regard to Mr. Smith." Okay. There are two mistakes, here. See if you can find them. Okay. So, the first one is right here. We don't say: "Please to give", "Please to write", "Please something". No. We just say: "Please give", "Please reply". Right? "Please respond", "Please ask". Don't say: "to ask" or anything like that. "Please give my regard" is not right. It should be "regards". "Please give my regards to Mr. Smith." All right? We can't say "regard" just like that, without the "s", so make sure you add an "s" there.

Number four: "I am interesting your products.", "I am interesting your products." That's not right. We need to say, what? Can you find the mistake? Here. "I am interested", okay? "I am interested", your products are interesting. So the thing you're talking about is with the "ing". The product is interesting, the book is interesting, the movie is interesting. Okay? But when we talk about my feelings or somebody's feelings about that, we have to say that with the "ed". "I am interested", "I am excited", okay? Like that. But there's still one other small mistake, now. Now it says: "I am interested your products." So this part is right: "I am interested", but we need to have a preposition after that. What is it? "I am interested in", "I am interested in your products." Okay? Good.

Number five: "When I will be in London, I'll call you." Okay? "When I will be in London, I'll call you." In many languages, this would... This kind of structure would be correct, but in English, it's not, because there are really two parts to this sentence. Right? This one: "When I will be in London", and then the other part: "I'll call you". So I'll help you to find the mistake by telling you that this part of the sentence is actually fine. "I'll call you" is short for "I will call you", that's fine, but in this part of the sentence which has a conditional word-all right?-we do not put the future tense. We write, here, we use, here, the present simple tense. So, instead of saying: "When I will be in London", we say: "When I"... "When I am in London" or "When I'm in London, I'll call you." Okay? So when you have a sentence like that in the future and you're going to... You have two parts that have future in one section, in the other section don't use the future tense, just use present simple. And it doesn't matter what the order is. It's the same principle if the sentence was: "I'll call you", right? "I'll call you when I'm in London." So even if we change the order, the principle stays the same. Okay.

Number six: "It was pleasure to meet you." This one's almost right, but not completely right. So, what's wrong, here?

Related of "How to write a letter: Find the Mistakes!" Videos

IELTS General: Writing Task 1 – 14 Top Tips!

Learn English with Rebecca [engVid] 621,611

How native speakers say AND & THE in English

Learn English with Rebecca [engVid] 120,642

Talking about "having something done" in English

Learn English with Rebecca [engVid] 183,896

Fix two BIG errors in English writing!

Learn English with Rebecca [engVid] 103,013

English Vocabulary: Crime & Criminals

Learn English with Rebecca [engVid] 138,019

Common English Grammar Errors with Plurals

Learn English with Rebecca [engVid] 204,484

Do you know these 8 idioms with 'TAKE'?

Learn English with Rebecca [engVid] 145,309

Basic English Grammar - Have, Has, Had

EnglishLessons4U - Learn English with Ronnie! [engVid] 17,160,122

How to introduce yourself & other people

Learn English with Rebecca [engVid] 1,165,000

Parallelism: The secret to great writing

Learn English with Rebecca [engVid] 122,394

The 10 WORST English mistakes you're making!

Learn English with Rebecca [engVid] 237,222